Part 2

Research

Culture Swap/ Neighbourhood Research

Sheela Gowda

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Sheela Gowda

As I was interested exploring identity for the Lanyard project I was intrigued by this work. Ones apperence and ones hair is a notable part of ones identity. I thought it was interesting how this installation brought full attention to this part of ones identity, exaggerating it and abstracting it to create something exciting from something that would otherwise be seen as dull or normal. I would now like to research into my own hair, it’s texture and colour and how it has changed over time.

Anselm Kiefer

I went to visit this exhibition at the White Cube last year and I was drawn to it again when researching identity. Our everyday routines, habits and struggles are part of our identity I believe. I have struggled with insomnia and seeing these hard beds mad of lead, to me, reflects my bed when I can’t sleep. Although this is not what the actual work was about, I thought it was an interesting way to convey my point. If I choose to further my project in this direction, I could experiment using hard materials or just materials which create an unpleasant feeling such as sharp edges or cold metal.

Guerrilla Girls, Do Women Have To Be Naked To Get Into the Met. Museum?, 1989

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I have always admired Martin Parrs work. Last year I attended a lecture of his and when researching into my own identity I was instantly reminded of his work. He manages to perfectly capture culture and everyday lives in their most raw form but also with the addition of humour. Because of this, as a British person, I was drawn to his images of British culture. 

Being a Teenager in London

Zoe Buckman

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Lanyard Project Research

Aboriginal Art, Emily Kame Kngwarreye

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Emily Kame Kngwarreye was a famous Australian Aboriginal artist. I find the dotted pattern, which characterises her work and many other aboriginal pieces reminds me of the desert sand and is  something that I would like to experiment with perhaps with painting or finding other materials which I could place together to create a cluster of circles. These two pieces have contrasting colour schemes and has made me consider how and why I use light and dark colours in my samples. 

A Murri family group in QLD, featuring a woman wearing an emu feather cloak, and men garbed in lap laps (likely kangaroo, wallaby), A. P. Elkin, Les Aborigènes Australiens. (Gallimard 1967)

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Anatjari Tjakamarra

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Indigenous People (australia.gov.au)

Carvings

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A kangaroo teeth pendant collected by Paul Foelsche in the late 1800s, Northern Territory.

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Collecting Bush Oranges. A painting by Kaitish artist Reggie Sultan, Central Australia

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'The U-shaped motifs are the traditional symbols representing a seated person, and in this case, each arc represents a woman. The oval shapes on each side represent the women’s coolamons (wooden bark dishes) which are used to collect the bush fruit'

Aboriginal ceremonies

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Two boys painted and decorated for their circumcision ceremony on Elcho Island, Northern Territory. 1960.
Photograph by Ruth Beazley

A south-east Australian man with his elaborately carved and painted shield.

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Native Australian Plants - Bottlebrush

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Dorothy Napangardi

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The effect of colour on mood

Aboriginal Art, Albert Namatjira

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Symbols used in Papunya Central Desert art

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Traditional Aboriginal Clothing

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Denim Project Research

The Natural World Up Close, Giles Sparrow, 2011

I decided to research into this book as I wanted to gain a deeper insight into the structures of natural forms. These images show what forms such as moss and mushrooms look like under a microscope. I could use these structures to influence the shapes I choose to work with in my work. 

Antoine Bridier-Nahmias

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Johanna Mårtensson

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Elin Thomas

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Dagmar Binder

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Structure of a leaf

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Shrinking surfaces

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Patterns of cracks in nature

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mold

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mold

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Gemma Schiebe

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Aranda men from Central Australia

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A decorated tjunga (folded and sewn bark container) from the Tiwi Islands, north of Darwin, Northern Territory

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ground design

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An elaborate ground design produced for a men’s ceremony. Warramunga tribe, Northern Territory.
Photograph by Baldwin Spencer and F. J. Gillen, The Arunta.